Sunday29 August 20047:12pm MDT2004-08-30 UTC 0112 last
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2004 QF14 on 28 Aug. 2004 
©Copyright 2004 Great Shefford Obs.

The Asteroid/Comet Connection's
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Cover: Small object 2004 QF14 steals through the night in this animation by Peter Birtwhistle from very early yesterday at Great Shefford Observatory in England. See below for more about this object.

Details: 2004 QF14. 2004 Aug. 27 2355-Aug. 28 0022 UT. Each frame a stack of 12x30s exposures, mag +18.3. Binned 2x2 and enlarged x2. Field 10'x10', north up. 0.30m f/6.3 Schmidt-Cassegrain + CCD, ©Copyright 2004 Great Shefford Obs. (J95)
Small objects – panel 1/2 Major News for 29 August 2004 back top next  

Small objects
Discovery & follow-up for 23-29 August

These past seven days have been good ones for watching small objects (defined at right). Six discoveries were announced, tieing the count from two weeks ago (report), the best since mid-June. Half of these were found by FMO Project volunteers around the world reviewing images from the Spacewatch 0.9m telescope in Arizona, and the other three were discovered by LINEAR in New Mexico. And another six small asteroids were tracked. Seventeen observing facilities participated in the week's work.

2004 QA22 made the week's closest flyby, at 2.5 lunar distances (LD) on Tuesday. 2004 QR was at 6.2 LD the day before, and 13.6 LD was the passage distance for two objects almost 13 hours apart on Friday: 2004 QN22 and 2004 QO5. No close flybys are predicted for this coming week.

<< previous report | skip table | Small objects table >>

What’s so big about “small objects?” If an asteroid’s orbit brings it to within 0.05 astronomical units (AU) of Earth's orbit, it is categorized as “potentially hazardous” unless it has an absolute magnitude H greater than 22.0, which corresponds to a diameter on the order of 135 meters/yards. Larger H means less bright, thus smaller size. And 0.05 AU is about 19.5 times the distance between Earth and Moon (0.00256 AU). To be discovered and tracked, such objects usually must come close (a few are Earth’s nearest neighbors, coming closer than the Moon). They are exposed pieces of distant asteroid populations, and they have within their own population tomorrow’s meteors. And their discovery and follow-up represents today’s best amateur and professional asteroid observing work. Diameter & Earth MOID: In the following observation summary table, the stated diameters are rough best estimates from a standard but very inexact H-to-size formula using H (absolute magnitude, or brightness) from the JPL NEO Orbital Elements page, source also for Earth MOID (minimum orbital intersection distance). Current Minor Planet Center H is also given, along with the original H from each object's discovery MPEC. Other sources: Planetary MOIDs are from Lowell Observatory. Priorities and visibilities are from the European Spaceguard Central Node (SCN). And flyby distances and times are from the JPL Close Approach Table. See also the Sormano Observatory SAEL (H>22.0 and Earth MOID<0.015 AU), and NEODyS listings have yet another H calculation.
Small objects – panel 2/2 (table) Major News for 29 August 2004 back top next  

Small object observation summary for 23-29 August

H = absolute magnitude (brightness), from which size is roughly estimated   —   m/yd = meters/yards   —   [cross index]
All objects had observations reported last week. Those on a light-blue background had observations from only before the week.


Object
Estimated
diameter
JPL
H
MPC
H
Discovery
H in MPEC
Earth
MOID
European Spaceguard Central Node
priority/visibility/campaign
2004 QA22
Aten
has VIs
10 m/yd27.7427.827.6 2004-Q550.004098 AU
NEW: 2004 QA22 was discovered on 25 Aug. by LINEAR, was confirmed on 26 Aug. by LINEAR, and on 27 Aug. by Great Shefford Obs. and Gnosca Obs., and was announced in MPEC 2004-Q55 of 28 Aug. This object was also observed on 28 Aug. by Marxuquera Obs. and Great Shefford Obs.
2004 QR4
Apollo
16 m/yd26.6126.926.9 2004-Q320.005748 AU
NEW: 2004 QR4 was discovered on 20 Aug. by FMO Project (FMOP) online volunteer Jan Manek (Czech Republic) reviewing images from the Spacewatch 0.9m telescope. It was confirmed on 21 and 23 Aug. with the same telescope, and on 21 Aug. by Grasslands Obs., and it was announced in MPEC 2004-Q32 of 23 Aug. and hasn't been reported seen since. The SCN Priority List, which removed this object after the 26th, noted it would go out of view on 28 Aug.
2004 QO5
Apollo
24 m/yd25.7325.926.2 2004-Q370.031277 AUUrgent, visibility ends 3 Sept.
NEW: 2004 QO5 was discovered on 20 Aug. by FMOP volunteer Sebastian Hoenig (Germany) in images from the Spacewatch 0.9m telescope. It was confirmed on 21 Aug. by Grasslands Obs. and on 23 Aug. with the discovery telescope, and was announced in MPEC 2004-Q37 of 23 Aug. This object was also observed on 25 Aug. by Mt. John Obs.
2004 QJ13
Amor
30 m/yd25.2925.325.3 2004-Q420.040617 AUUrgent, visibility ends 18 Sept.
NEW: 2004 QJ13 was discovered on 23 Aug. by FMOP volunteer Richard Broad (Australia) in images from the Spacewatch 0.9m telescope. It was confirmed on 23 Aug. by KLENOT, on 24 Aug. by Andrushivka Obs., and on 25 Aug. with the discovery telescope and Sabino Canyon Obs.. It was announced in MPEC 2004-Q42 of 25 Aug. and hasn't been reported seen since.
2004 PB97
Amor
35 m/yd24.9325.325.1 2004-P580.027777 AUNecessary, visibility ends 7 Sept.
2004 PB97 was observed on 24 Aug. with the Australian Natl. Univ. (ANU) 1m telescope.
2004 QB3
Aten
43 m/yd24.4624.524.4 2004-Q260.020061 AUUrgent, visibility ends 5 Sept.
2004 QB3 was observed on 26 Aug. by Jornada Obs. It has an MOID of 0.034 AU with Venus.
2004 QN22
Apollo
53 m/yd24.0424.324.4 2004-Q560.011756 AU
NEW: 2004 QN22 was discovered on 25 Aug. by LINEAR, was confirmed on 27 Aug. by Great Shefford Obs., and on 28 Aug. by Marxuquera Obs., Great Shefford Obs., and Pla D'Arguines Obs., and was announced in MPEC 2004-Q56 of 28 Aug. This object was also observed on 27 Aug. by LINEAR.
2004 PJ
Amor
96 m/yd22.7323.123.0 2004-P210.060154 AUUseful, visibility ends 19 Sept.
2004 PJ was observed on 23 Aug. by KLENOT. It has an MOID of 0.042 AU with Mars.
2004 LK
Amor
99 m/yd22.6722.722.7 2004-L220.068705 AUUseful, visibility ends 10 Oct.
2004 LK was observed on 24 Aug. with the ANU 1m telescope (at mag. R=21.4 to 21.7), adding 34.972 days to what had been a 41.304-day observing arc.
2004 QF14
Apollo
102 m/yd22.6123.024.2 2004-Q460.017421 AUNecessary, visibility ends 8 Oct.
NEW: 2004 QF14 was discovered on 25 Aug. by LINEAR, was confirmed on 25 Aug. by Great Shefford Obs. and Highworth Obs., and was announced in MPEC 2004-Q46 of 26 Aug. This object was also observed on 26 Aug. by LINEAR, on 27 Aug. by Jurassien-Vicques Obs., and on 28 Aug. by Great Shefford Obs. (see cover above). This object was posted with one impact solution on the 26th that was removed on the 27th.
2004 PF20
Amor
108 m/yd22.4822.622.5 2004-P360.110665 AUUseful, visibility ends 25 Sept.
2004 PF20 was observed on 23 Aug. by KLENOT.
2004 QA2
Amor
116 m/yd22.3322.322.1 2004-Q210.030032 AUUseful, visibility ends 6 Oct.
2004 QA2 was observed on 21 Aug. by Grasslands Obs., on 23 Aug. by the Southern Sky Survey (SSS), and on 28 Aug. with the ANU 1m telescope.

  Small object observation cross index   [table top]
ObjectObserved by MPC code
2004 LK413
2004 PB97413
2004 PF20246
2004 PJ246
2004 QA2413, 651 & E12
2004 QA22143, 704, 952 & J95
2004 QB3651, 673 & 715
2004 QF14185, 704, 951 & J95
2004 QJ13246, 691, 854 & A50
2004 QN22704, 941, 952 & J95
2004 QO5474 & 691
2004 QR4691
CodeObservatoryObjects observed (days)
143Gnosca Obs.2004 QA22
185Jurassien-Vicques Obs.2004 QF14
246KLENOT2004 PF20, 2004 PJ & 2004 QJ13
413Australian Natl. Univ. (ANU) 1m telescope2004 LK, 2004 PB97 & 2004 QA2
474Mt. John Obs.2004 QO5
651Grasslands Obs.2004 QA2 & 2004 QB3
673Table Mountain Obs.2004 QB3
691Spacewatch 0.9m telescope2004 QJ13(2), 2004 QO5(2) & 2004 QR4(2)
704LINEAR2004 QA22(2), 2004 QF14(2) & 2004 QN22(2)
715Jornada Obs.2004 QB3
854Sabino Canyon Obs.2004 QJ13
941Pla D'Arguines Obs.2004 QN22
951Highworth Obs.2004 QF14
952Marxuquera Obs.2004 QA22 & 2004 QN22
A50Andrushivka Obs.2004 QJ13
E12Southern Sky Survey (SSS)2004 QA2
J95Great Shefford Obs.2004 QA22(2), 2004 QF14(2) & 2004 QN22(2)
News briefs – panel 1/1 Major News for 29 August 2004 previous
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News briefs

Outlying NEOs:  Just within the q=1.3 AU definition for near-Earth objects is 2004 QU24 at q=1.2934. It was announced today in MPEC 2004-Q61 as discovered on the 27th by the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) in Arizona and confirmed by six other observing facilities. The first calculation of its absolute magnitude (brightness) is H=16.0, which converts by standard formula to very roughly 2.1 km. (1.3 miles), and appears to be one of the larger NEOs discovered this year.

Announced not in its own MPEC but in the Sunday Daily Orbit Update MPEC is 2004 QE14, credited to the Siding Spring Survey (SSS) in New South Wales for discovery on the 24th and followed by three other observatories the next day and yesterday. The MPC orbital elements given have perihelion at 1.2863 AU and H=17.0, which puts it on the order of more than a kilometer wide. JPL's orbital elements today give an unusual "n/a" for H for this object.

Editorial note:  Due to travel, A/CC news will appear on an interrupted minimum basis beginning tomorrow, Monday. We will concentrate on posting A/CC's own original reporting (risk monitoring coverage, etc.) as best as we can first. When we can, we will also gather links to news posted elsewhere, on sites such as are listed here. If you don't have time to do your own news searches, your best bets are SpaceToday.net for general and planetary science articles and news releases, plus SpaceRef.com and EurekAlert for news releases. Risk monitoring key links are maintained on the CRT page.

Bits & pieces:  Don Machholz told the Comets Mailing List today that he made his latest discovery (see yesterday) with his 1968 0.15m (6") Criterion Dynascope with “a 2" OD eyepiece pressed over the focussing tube, yielding 30x and a field of view of about 2 degrees.” This came after 1,457 hours of hunting “since my previous find, in 1994, when I found three comets in four months.”

There is a nice piece at the Palm Beach Post today that brings together the March passages of little asteroids 2004 FH and 2004 FU162 and September's attention-getting pass by big 4179 Toutatis.

Risk monitoring - panel 1/1 Major News for 29 August 2004 previous
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Risk monitoring yesterday 29 August Tuesday

The Sunday Daily Orbit Update MPEC (DOU) has observation of 2004 QZ2 from the Australian National University (ANU) 1m telescope in New South Wales on Wednesday, from Jornada Observatory in New Mexico Thursday morning, and early Friday from Naef Observatory in Switzerland, Wildberg Observatory in Germany, and Marxuquera Observatory in Spain. Today both NEODyS and JPL removed their last impact solutions for this nearly kilometer size object.

2004 QD14 was removed today by both monitors after the DOU reported two observations with the ANU 1m telescope from yesterday.

The DOU also has observations of 2004 QB17 from late Friday from Naef Observatory, and on the other side of midnight from Great Shefford Observatory in England. JPL originally estimated this object's diameter at 530 meters/yards and bumped that up a bit with the next observations, and today puts it at “917” meters (which looks exact, but is actually only a rough best estimate). JPL cut its count of impact solutions and slightly lowered its risk ratings, while NEODyS today increased its count by three and slightly raised its lower ratings for this object.

Summary Risk Table - sources checked at 2359 UTC, 29 Aug

Object

Assessment

Years

VI
PS
cum
PS
max
T
S
Arc 
days
 2004 QZ2JPL 8/29R E M O V E D
NEODyS 8/29R E M O V E D
 2004 QD14JPL 8/29R E M O V E D
NEODyS 8/29R E M O V E D
 2004 QB17 NEODyS 8/292020-20718-5.13-5.7302.739
JPL 8/292013-209712-4.71-5.0902.739
 2004 QA22JPL 8/292093-20942-8.60-8.7503.555
 2004 FU162JPL 8/242006-2104824-5.38-6.3700.031
VI = count of "virtual impactors" (impact solutions)
See A/CC's Consolidated Risk Tables for more and maybe
  newer details, and check the monitors' links for latest info.
Note that only objects recently in view are shown here.

And the DOU has observation of small object 2004 QA22 from yesterday morning from Marxuquera Observatory and last night from Great Shefford Observatory. Only JPL has this object listed, and today lowered its risk ratings.

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