Sunday2 May 20044:56pm MDT2004-05-02 UTC 2256 back top next  

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Cover: FMO Project discovery 2004 HC33, estimated at about 20-25 meters/yards wide, was reported during 23-27 April by seven observing facilities, including three times by Peter Birtwhistle at Great Shefford Observatory in England. At left is a stack from last Sunday night, the 25th, when 2004 HC33 was flying past Earth at 7.1 lunar distances.

Details: 2004 HC33. 2004 04 25 2230-2243 UT. Mag +18.8. 42x6-sec. exposures (total exposure 4m12s). Binned 2x2 and enlarged x2. Motion 40"/min in p.a. 49°. Field 10'x10', North up. 0.30m f/6.3 Schmidt-Cassegrain + CCD. J95.

Small objects – panel 1/2 Major News for 2 May 2004 back top next  

Small objects
Discovery & follow-up 26 April–2 May

Despite the brightening Moon, six new small object discoveries were announced last week, another nine were tracked from Sunday through yesterday (three with impact solutions), and observations were reported for two more from earlier in April. (A "small" object is defined here as having absolute magnitude H=22.0 or greater, which converts inexactly to a diameter of 135 meters/yards or less.)

Twenty-eight observing facilities participated in this work, with Powell Observatory in Kansas catching the most (seven). Four of the discoveries were made by LINEAR in New Mexico, and one each was made from Arizona with the Spacewatch 0.9m telescope and by the Catalina Sky Survey.

The smallest discovery, and smallest observed this week, is 2004 HT59, which is roughly estimated at a dozen meters/yards wide. And, according to the JPL Close Approaches page, the closest known flyby last week was made by that same object, on Monday at

2.7 lunar distances (LD). The next closest, by 2004 HS56, was yesterday at 14.1 LD, and 2004 HH20 came to 14.5 LD on Wednesday. The closest flyby predicted for a small object this next week will be 2004 HX53 at 12.5 LD on Friday.

<< previous report | skip table | Small objects table >>


If an asteroid's orbit brings it to within 0.05 AU of Earth's orbit, it is categorized as "potentially hazardous" unless it has an absolute magnitude H greater than 22.0, which corresponds to a diameter on the order of 135 meters/yards. Larger H is dimmer, thus smaller. And 0.05 astronomical units (AU) is about 19.5 times the distance between Earth and Moon (0.00256 AU).

Notes: Diameters in the following observation summary table are rough best estimates from a standard but very inexact H-to-size formula using H (absolute magnitude) from the JPL NEO Orbital Elements page, source also for Earth MOID (minimum orbital intersection). Other planetary MOIDs are from Lowell Observatory. Current Minor Planet Center H is also given, along with the original H from each object's discovery MPEC. Priorities and visibilities are from the European Spaceguard Central Node (SCN).

Small objects – panel 2/2 (table) Major News for 2 May 2004 back top next  

Small object observation summary for 26 April–2 May

H = absolute magnitude (brightness), from which size is roughly estimated   —   m/yd = meters/yards   —   [cross index]
All objects had observations reported last week. Those on a light-blue background had observations from only before the week.


Object
Estimated
diameter
JPL
H
MPC
H
Discovery
H in MPEC
Earth
MOID
European Spaceguard Central Node
priority/visibility/campaign
2004 HT59
Aten
12 m/yd27.3327.227.0 2004-H860.00634 AU
NEW: 2004 HT59 was discovered on 24 April by LINEAR, was confirmed on 25 April by the Southern Sky Survey (SSS), and was announced in MPEC 2004-H86 of 29 April. It was also observed 25 April by LINEAR. It passed Earth at 2.7 LD on the 26th and hasn't been reported since.
2004 HC33
Apollo
22 m/yd25.9426.025.8 2004-H600.01755 AU
2004 HC33 was observed on 24 April with the Spacewatch 1.8m telescope, on 25 April by Great Shefford Obs. (see "cover" image above), and on 27 April by Powell Obs.
2004 HH20
Amor
34 m/yd24.9825.124.7 2004-H510.03016 AUUrgent, visibility ends 17 May
2004 HH20, which passed Earth at 14.5 LD on 28 April, was observed on the 25th by Mt. John Obs.
2004 HD
Amor
40 m/yd24.6524.824.5 2004-H190.03048 AUUseful, visibility ends 6 Jun.
2004 HD was observed on 25 April by the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and Hunters Hill Obs.
2004 GD2
Apollo
52 m/yd24.0824.324.2 2004-G280.02000 AUUseful, visibility ends 7 Jun.
2004 GD2 was observed on 25 April by Hunters Hill Obs. It has an MOID of 0.001 AU with Mars.
2004 GC19
Apollo
52 m/yd24.0624.124.1 2004-H060.03505 AU
2004 GC19 was observed on 25 April by Great Shefford Obs. See "cover" image April 29th, and Peter Birtwhistle's 2004 GC19 page.
2004 EU22
Apollo
62 m/yd23.6823.723.7 2004-F220.00801 AUUseful, visibility ends 25 May
2004 EU22 was reported this last week as observed on 2 April by Pulkovo Obs.
2004 HT38
Amor
71 m/yd23.3923.523.6 2004-H710.09863 AUNecessary, visibility ends 31 May
NEW: 2004 HT38 was discovered on 24 April by LINEAR, was confirmed on 24 April by Consell Obs., and on 25 April by Great Shefford Obs., Sabino Canyon Obs., Desert Moon Obs., and Mt. John Obs., and was announced in MPEC 2004-H71 of 25 April. This object was also observed on 25 April by Mt. John Obs., on 27 April by Powell Obs., on 28 April by NEAT/Haleakala, and on 30 April by Tenagra II Obs.
2004 HR56
Apollo
75 m/yd23.2823.323.3 2004-H820.06039 AUUrgent, visibility ends 10 May
NEW: 2004 HR56 was discovered on 25 April with the Spacewatch 0.9m telescope, was confirmed on 27 April by Andrushivka Obs. and Obs. Astronomico de Mallorca (OAM), and on 28 April by Drebach Obs., Powell Obs., and Sabino Canyon Obs., and was announced in MPEC 2004-H82 of 28 April, but hasn't been reported since. It has an MOID of 0.024 AU with Mars.
2004 HQ1
Apollo
has VI
78 m/yd23.1923.023.0 2004-H380.00230 AUNecessary, visibility ends 3 Jun.
2004 HQ1 was observed on 25 April by Hunters Hill Obs. and Sormano Obs., on 27 April by Powell Obs., and on 28 April with the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) at La Palma and by David Tholen's team at the Univ. of Hawaii 2.2m Telescope.
2004 HM
Apollo
has VIs
83 m/yd23.0523.223.3 2004-H250.00338 AUNecessary, visibility ends 22 May
2004 HM was observed on 25 April by Pla D'Arguines Obs. and Sandlot Obs., on 26 April by LINEAR, and on 27 April by Sandlot Obs.
2004 HX53
Apollo
87 m/yd22.9623.623.8 2004-H800.02080 AU
NEW: 2004 HX53 was discovered on 26 April by LINEAR, was confirmed on 26 April by OAM, and on 27 April by Powell Obs. and Sabino Canyon Obs., and was announced in MPEC 2004-H80 of 27 April. This object was also observed on 27 April by LINEAR and Consell Obs., on 30 April by Table Mountain Obs., and on 1 May by Tenagra II Obs. This object, which will pass Earth at 12.5 LD on 7 May, has an MOID of 0.050 AU with Mars.
2004 GB19
Apollo
90 m/yd22.8823.022.7 2004-H040.01060 AUNecessary, visibility ends 25 May
2004 GB19 was reported this last week as observed on 24 April by Pla D'Arguines Obs. It has an MOID of 0.011 AU with Mars.
2004 HB39
Amor
103 m/yd22.5822.622.5 2004-H740.09266 AUUseful, visibility ends 17 Aug.
NEW: 2004 HB39 was discovered on 25 April by CSS, was confirmed 25 April by Starkenburg Obs. and 26 April by Table Mountain Obs., and was announced in MPEC 2004-H74 of 26 April. This object was also observed on 28 April by Powell Obs. and on 1 May by Tenagra II Obs.
2004 HZ
Apollo
has VIs
122 m/yd22.2122.722.8 2004-H340.00003 AUUrgent, visibility ends 7 May
2004 HZ was observed on 25 April by Jornada Obs. and Sormano Obs., on 29 April with the INT at La Palma, and on 1 May by Jornada Obs. and the Spacewatch 1.8m telescope.
2004 HS56
Amor
133 m/yd22.0322.222.0 2004-H830.03047 AUNecessary, visibility ends 26 May
NEW: 2004 HS56 was discovered on 27 April by LINEAR, was confirmed on 27 April by Andrushivka Obs. and OAM, and on 28 April by Drebach Obs., Powell Obs., and Sabino Canyon Obs., and was announced in MPEC 2004-H83 of 28 April. It was also observed on 28 April by LINEAR, Table Mountain Obs., Francisquito Obs., and University Hills Obs., on 30 April by Robert Hutsebaut via New Mexico Skies, and on 1 May, the day this object passed Earth at 14.1 LD, by Tenagra II Obs.
2004 HG12
Apollo
137 m/yd21.9722.422.9 2004-H470.02605 AUUrgent, visibility ends 8 May
2004 HG12 was observed on 27 April by Table Mountain Obs.

  Small object observation cross index   [table top]
ObjectObserved by MPC code
2004 EU22084
2004 GB19941
2004 GC19J95
2004 GD2E14
2004 HB39611, 649, 673, 703 & 926
2004 HC33291, 649 & J95
2004 HD703 & E14
2004 HG12673
2004 HH20474
2004 HM704, 941 & H36
2004 HQ1568, 587, 649, 950 & E14
2004 HR56113, 620, 649, 691, 854 & A50
2004 HS56113, 620, 649, 673, 704, 854, 926, A50, G70, G72 & H06
2004 HT38448, 474, 608, 649, 854, 926 & J95
2004 HT59704 & E12
2004 HX53176, 620, 649, 673, 704, 854 & 926
2004 HZ291, 587, 715 & 950
CodeObservatoryObjects observed (days)
084Pulkovo Obs.2004 EU22
113Drebach Obs.2004 HR56 & 2004 HS56
176Consell Obs.2004 HX53
291Spacewatch 1.8m telescope2004 HC33 & 2004 HZ
448Desert Moon Obs.2004 HT38
474Mt. John Obs.2004 HH20 & 2004 HT38(2)
568U. Hawaii 2.2m Tel./Tholen team2004 HQ1
587Sormano Obs.2004 HQ1 & 2004 HZ
608NEAT/Haleakala2004 HT38
611Starkenburg Obs.2004 HB39
620Obs. Astron. de Mallorca2004 HR56, 2004 HS56 & 2004 HX53
649Powell Obs.2004 HB39, 2004 HC33, 2004 HQ1, 2004 HR56, 2004 HS56, 2004 HT38 & 2004 HX53
673Table Mountain Obs.2004 HB39, 2004 HG12, 2004 HS56 & 2004 HX53
691Spacewatch 0.9m telescope2004 HR56
703Catalina Sky Survey (CSS)2004 HB39 & 2004 HD
704LINEAR2004 HM, 2004 HS56(2), 2004 HT59 & 2004 HX53(2)
715Jornada Obs.2004 HZ(2)
854Sabino Canyon Obs.2004 HR56, 2004 HS56, 2004 HT38 & 2004 HX53
926Tenagra II Obs.2004 HB39, 2004 HS56, 2004 HT38 & 2004 HX53
941Pla D'Arguines Obs.2004 GB19 & 2004 HM
9502.5m I.N. Telescope, La Palma2004 HQ1 & 2004 HZ
A50Andrushivka Obs.2004 HR56 & 2004 HS56
E12Southern Sky Survey (SSS)2004 HT59
E14Hunters Hill Obs.2004 GD2, 2004 HD & 2004 HQ1
G70Francisquito Obs.2004 HS56
G72University Hills Obs.2004 HS56
H06N.M. Skies/R. Hutsebaut2004 HS56
H36Sandlot Obs.2004 HM(2)
J95Great Shefford Obs.2004 GC19, 2004 HC33 & 2004 HT38
Risk monitoring - panel 1/1 Major News for 2 May 2004 back top next  
Risk monitoring 2 May

The Sunday Daily Orbit Update MPEC (DOU) has observation of 2004 HZ from early yesterday from Jornada Observatory in New Mexico and from the Spacewatch 1.8m telescope in Arizona. Today NEODyS and JPL very slightly raised their overall risk ratings for this small object, which goes out of view in a few days.

The DOU also has positions reported for 2004 HK33 from NEAT's Hawaiian telescope yesterday. Today both risk monitors slightly lowered their risk assessments for this kilometer-size object.

The only other object with impact solutions that is reported in today's DOU is 2004 GA1, which was followed up Friday by Reedy Creek Observatory in Australia, discoverer of this kilometer-size object. Today JPL removed its only impact solution for 2004 GA1.

Summary Risk Table - sources checked at 2159 UTC, 2 May

Object

Assessment

Years

VI
PS
cum
PS
max
T
S
Arc 
days
 2004 HZ NEODyS 5/22023-20454-2.39-2.39011.973
JPL 5/22023-20333-2.44-2.44011.973
 2004 HW NEODyS 4/292016-20453-4.82-5.1306.891
JPL 4/292092-20921-3.50-3.5006.891
 2004 HQ1 NEODyS 4/302065-20651-7.57-7.5709.741
JPL 4/302065-20651-7.73-7.7309.741
 2004 HMJPL 4/292101-21042-5.05-5.05010.990
 2004 HK33 NEODyS 5/22041-20686-2.87-3.07010.165
JPL 5/22019-20687-2.64-2.88010.165
 2004 HE62JPL 5/12064-20872-5.22-5.3304.164
 2004 GE2JPL 4/242100-21001-6.02-6.02011.811
 2004 GA1JPL 5/2R E M O V E D
NEODyS 4/19R E M O V E D
VI = count of "virtual impactors" (impact solutions)
See A/CC's Consolidated Risk Tables for more and maybe
  newer details, and check the monitors' links for latest info.
Note that only objects recently in view are shown here.
http://www.HohmannTransfer.com/mn/0405/02.htm   [ top ]
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