Sunday18 April 20049:38pm MDT2004-04-19 UTC 0338 back top next  

The Asteroid/Comet Connection's
daily news journal about
asteroids, comets, and meteors


Today's issue status: done
yesterdayApriltomorrowIndex

Cover: As 2004 FY31 raced from its discovery location (discovered by LONEOS March 31.30, upper-right red dot), Peter Birtwhistle in England pursued it through Draco and into Cygnus and the Milky Way (images and orange dots), where the last optical observation came from Tenagra II Observatory on April 11.47 after passing Earth at 12.1 lunar distances on the 10th. Arecibo radar caught it on April 14.54 (lower-left red dot). See Great Shefford Observatory's 2004 FY31 page for further explanation, an animation, and a different star chart. At JPL's absolute magnitude H=21.89 calculation, FY31 is bright enough to squeak into the potentially hazardous category.

Small objects – panel 1/2 Major News for 18 April 2004 back top next  

Small objects
Discovery & follow-up 12-18 April

It was another spectacular week for small objects, those with absolute magnitude calculated at greater than H=22.0, which converts to roughly smaller than 135 meters/yards wide. Nine discoveries were announced, and the smallest actually flew through the Earth-Moon system early today UT. That one, 2004 HE, was discovered by Michael Van Ness at LONEOS, while the other eight were found by LINEAR. Besides the discoveries, another eight small objects were tracked, and older observations were reported for seven more. All this work was done by some 38 professional, educational, and amateur observing facilities plus one archive sleuth, but, oddly enough, neither of the Spacewatch telescopes were involved.

Of special note this week is the work of amateur astronomer Krisztian Sarneczky of the Szeged University (SZTE) Asteroid program in Hungary. Among his new data reported last week from the NEAT archives were observations that extended the old observing arcs of four small objects and added

positions for two more (and also updated a larger object on April 14th that has impact solutions).

Early today UT, 2004 HE was at 0.72 lunar distance (LD). Checking the Sormano SAEL and JPL Close Approaches for other flybys, 2004 HM was at 5.1 LD last Tuesday, and 2004 HL was at 5.6 LD and 2004 GD2 at 9.6 LD on Wednesday. This coming week, 2004 GD will be at 6.0 LD on Tuesday and 2004 HB at 10.2 LD on Wednesday.

<< previous report | skip table | Small objects table >>

If an asteroid's orbit brings it to within 0.05 AU of Earth's orbit, it is categorized as "potentially hazardous" unless it has an absolute magnitude H greater than 22.0, which corresponds to a diameter on the order of 135 meters/yards. Larger H is dimmer, thus smaller. And 0.05 astronomical units (AU) is about 19.5 times the distance between Earth and Moon (0.00256 AU).

Notes: Diameters in the following table are rough best estimates from a very inexact H-to-size formula using H (absolute magnitude) from the JPL NEO Orbital Elements page, source also for Earth MOID (minimum orbital intersection). Other MOIDs are from Lowell Observatory. Current MPC H is also given, along with discovery MPEC H. Priorities and visibilities are from the European Spaceguard Central Node (SCN).

Small objects – panel 2/2 (table) Major News for 18 April 2004 back top next  

Small object observation summary for 12-18 April

H = absolute magnitude (brightness), from which size is roughly estimated   —   m/yd = meters/yards   —   [cross index]
All objects had observations reported last week. Those on a light-blue background had observations from only before the week.


Object
Estimated
diameter
JPL
H
MPC
H
Discovery
H in MPEC
Earth
MOID
European Spaceguard Central Node
priority/visibility/campaign
2004 HE
Apollo
15 m/yd26.7526.726.7 2004-H160.00004 AU
NEW: 2004 HE was discovered on 16 April by LONEOS, was confirmed on 16 April by the Siding Spring Survey (SSS) and KLENOT, and on 17 April by Robert Hutsebaut via New Mexico Skies (see yesterday's cover), Mt. John Obs., and SSS, and was announced in MPEC 2004-H16 yesterday. No observations were reported today. It has an MOID of 0.027 AU with Mars, and early today passed the Earth at 0.722 LD and then the Moon at 0.639 LD. See yesterday's special report.
2004 FM32
Apollo
16 m/yd26.5927.127.2 2004-G010.00221 AUNecessary, visibility ends 22 Apr.
2004 FM32 was observed on 14 April by Tim Spahr from Whipple Obs.
2004 FH
Aten
18 m/yd26.4225.725.7 2004-F240.00008 AU
2004 FH was reported this last week as observed on 18 March by Bisei Spaceguard Center (BSC). It has an MOID of 0.009 AU with Venus.
2004 HL
Apollo
18 m/yd26.4126.5 2004-H240.01407 AU
NEW: 2004 HL was discovered on 16 April by LINEAR, was confirmed on 17 April by LINEAR and Mt. John Obs., and was announced in MPEC 2004-H24 of 18 April. It passed Earth at 5.6 LD on April 14th.
2004 HD
Amor
42 m/yd24.5324.524.5 2004-H190.03049 AU
NEW: 2004 HD was discovered on 16 April by LINEAR, was confirmed on 16 April by Andrushivka Obs. and KLENOT, and on 17 April by Southern TIE (SoTIE), Tenagra II Obs., and Powell Obs., and was announced in MPEC 2004-H19 yesterday. Update MPEC 2004-H23 today reports that this object was also observed on 16 April by LINEAR, Andrushivka Obs., and KLENOT and on 17 April by SoTIE, Tenagra II Obs., Powell Obs., Sabino Canyon Obs., and SSS. It will pass the Earth at 13.7 LD on April 20th.
2004 GD2
Apollo
51 m/yd24.1224.324.2 2004-G280.01999 AUNecessary, visibility ends 7 Jun.
NEW: 2004 GD2 was discovered on 12 April by LINEAR, was confirmed on 12 April by Obs. Astronomico de Mallorca (OAM) and Consell Obs., and on 13 April by Andrushivka Obs., Sabino Canyon Obs., Table Mountain Obs., Tenagra II Obs., Desert Moon Obs., and Hutsebaut/NM Skies (see Tuesday's cover), and was announced in MPEC 2004-G28 of 13 April. This object was also observed on 13 April by LINEAR, Great Shefford Obs., OAM, and Golden Hill Obs., on 14 April by Great Shefford Obs., Hobbs Obs., Powell Obs., OAM, LINEAR, and Buchloe Obs., on 15 April by LINEAR, and on 16 April by LINEAR. It has an MOID of 0.001 AU with Mars, and passed Earth at 9.6 LD on April 14th.
1996 TD9
Apollo
51 m/yd24.1024.0 1996-T070.02220 AU
1996 TD9 was reported this week as found by Krisztian Sarneczky in 18 Oct. 1996 NEAT/Haleakala archives. This added three positions and 1.727 days to what had been a 4.099-day observing arc with 23 observations.
2004 GC19
Apollo
53 m/yd24.0424.124.1 2004-H060.03498 AUUrgent, visibility ends 28 Apr.
NEW: 2004 GC19 was discovered on 15 April by LINEAR, was confirmed on 15 April by Great Shefford Obs., and on 16 April by Andrushivka Obs., Sabino Canyon Obs., Tenagra II Obs., and Hutsebaut/NM Skies, and was announced in MPEC 2004-H06 of 16 April. This object was also observed on 16 April by LINEAR and Hutsebaut/NM Skies.
2004 GZ14
Apollo
53 m/yd24.0224.024.0 2004-G440.02769 AUNecessary, visibility ends 29 Apr.
NEW: 2004 GZ14 was discovered on 14 April by LINEAR, was confirmed on 14 April by Great Shefford Obs., Drebach Obs., Starkenburg Obs., Ondrejov Obs., and KLENOT, and on 15 April by Modra Obs., Sabino Canyon Obs., Tenagra II Obs., and Desert Moon Obs., and was announced in MPEC 2004-G44 of 15 April. This object was also observed on 15 April by LINEAR and on 17 April by Linz Obs.
2004 EU22
Apollo
62 m/yd23.6823.723.7 2004-F220.00801 AUUseful, visibility ends 25 May
2004 EU22 was observed on 18 March by BSC, on 11 April by Sandlot Obs., on 12 April by LINEAR, on 14 April by Powell Obs., and on 15 April by Wildberg Obs. and Petit Jean Mountain Obs.
2004 GD
Apollo
63 m/yd23.6523.723.8 2004-G170.00600 AUUrgent, visibility ends 23 Apr.
2004 GD was observed on 11 April by Guidestar Obs., on 12 April by Guidestar Obs., on 13 April with the Australian Natl. Univ. (ANU) Obs. 1.0m telescope, on 14 April by Great Shefford Obs., Buchloe Obs., and Uccle Obs., on 15 April by Great Shefford Obs., and on 16 April by Goodricke-Pigott Obs. It has an MOID of 0.033 AU with Venus, and will pass the Earth at 6.0 LD on April 20th.
2004 FB18
Amor
64 m/yd23.6123.923.5 2004-F760.05857 AUUseful, visibility ends 15 Jun.
2004 FB18 was observed on 11 April by Tenagra II Obs. and on 14 April by Tim Spahr from Whipple Obs.
2004 HB
Apollo
72 m/yd23.3623.323.3 2004-H170.02128 AU
NEW: 2004 HB was discovered on 16 April by LINEAR, was confirmed on 16 April by KLENOT, and on 17 April by SoTIE and Tenagra II Obs., and was announced in MPEC 2004-H17 of 17 April. This object was also observed on 17 April by LINEAR. It will pass Earth at 10.2 LD on April 21st.
2001 TE45
Apollo
78 m/yd23.1823.3 2001-U130.09458 AU
2001 TE45 was reported this as found by Sarneczky in 16 and 20 Oct. 2001 NEAT/Palomar archives. This added five positions inside the existing observing arc that previously had had only 20 observations.
2004 HM
Apollo
has impact solutions
88 m/yd22.9223.3 2004-H250.00338 AU
NEW: 2004 HM was discovered on 16 April by LINEAR, was confirmed on 17 April by LINEAR, Tenagra II Obs., and Mt. John Obs., and on 18 April by Pla D'Arguines Obs., OAM, Sabino Canyon Obs., and Tenagra II Obs., and was announced in MPEC 2004-H25 today. It passed Earth at 5.1 LD on April 13th.
2004 FP4
Amor
89 m/yd22.9123.223.3 2004-F470.05278 AUUseful, visibility ends 22 Jul.
2004 FP4 was observed on 9 April by Mt. John Obs., on 12 April by LONEOS, on 13 April by Tenagra II Obs., and on 17 April by LINEAR. It has an MOID of 0.009 AU with Mars.
2004 GB19
Apollo
100 m/yd22.6422.722.7 2004-H040.01053 AUUrgent, visibility ends 25 May
NEW: 2004 GB19 was discovered on 15 April by LINEAR, was confirmed on 15 April by Great Shefford Obs., and on 16 April by Andrushivka Obs., Sabino Canyon Obs., and Hutsebaut/NM Skies, and was announced in MPEC 2004-H04 of 16 April. This object was also observed on 16 April by LINEAR. It has an MOID of 0.011 AU with Mars.
2001 UF5
Apollo
110 m/yd22.4422.922.2 2001-U380.00581 AU
2001 UF5 was reported by Sarneczky from archives as observed on 20 Oct. 2001 by NEAT/Haleakala and NEAT/Palomar. This added seven positions early within the existing observation arc that previously had had only 32 observations. 2001 UF5 has MOIDs of 0.000 AU with Venus and 0.001 AU with Mars.
2001 SQ263
Aten
112 m/yd22.4122.622.4 2001-S500.03203 AU
2001 SQ263 was reported by Sarneczky from archives as observed on 30 Sept. and 6 and 13 Oct. 2001 by NEAT/Palomar. This added eight positions and 1.969 days to what had been an 17.973-day observing arc with 30 observations. 2001 SQ263 has MOIDs of 0.028 AU with Mercury and 0.031 AU with Venus.
2001 UE18
Amor
119 m/yd22.2722.522.1 2001-U690.19148 AU
2001 UE18 was reported by Sarneczky from archives as observed 27 and 29 Oct. 2001 by NEAT/Palomar. This added six positions and 1.007 days to what had been a 1.945-day arc with nine observations.
2002 FT6
Aten
120 m/yd22.2622.522.7 2002-F730.04082 AU
2002 FT6 was observed 15 April by Carl Hergenrother from Whipple Obs., following up on the recovery A/CC reported April 5th
1997 VG
Amor
121 m/yd22.2422.5 1997-V060.08077 AU
1997 VG was reported by Sarneczky from archives as observed 30 Oct. 1997 by NEAT/Haleakala. This added 1.759 days to what had been an 8.078-day observing arc.
2004 BW18
Amor
124 m/yd22.1822.622.5 2004-B240.04478 AUUseful, visibility ends 30 May
2004 BW18 was observed on 13 April by Hunters Hill Obs.
2004 EO20
Amor
131 m/yd22.0622.221.6 2004-F140.16088 AUUseful, visibility ends 25 May
2004 EO20 was observed on 14 April by Tim Spahr from Whipple Obs.

  Small object observation cross index   [table top]
ObjectObserved by MPC code
1996 TD9566
1997 VG566
2001 SQ263644
2001 TE45644
2001 UE18644
2001 UF5608 & 644
2002 FT6696
2004 BW18E14
2004 EO20696
2004 EU22198, 300, 649, 704, H36 & H41
2004 FB18696 & 926
2004 FH300
2004 FM32696
2004 FP4474, 699, 704 & 926
2004 GB19704, 854, A50, H06 & J95
2004 GC19704, 854, 926, A50, H06 & J95
2004 GD012, 215, 413, 683, A17 & J95
2004 GD2176, 215, 448, 620, 649, 673, 704, 750, 854, 926, A50, H06, J77 & J95
2004 GZ14113, 118, 246, 448, 540, 557, 611, 704, 854, 926 & J95
2004 HB246, 704, 926 & I05
2004 HD246, 649, 704, 854, 926, A50, E12 & I05
2004 HE246, 474, 699, E12 & H06
2004 HL474 & 704
2004 HM474, 620, 704, 854, 926 & 941
CodeObservatoryObjects observed (days)
012Uccle Obs.2004 GD
113Drebach Obs.2004 GZ14
118Modra Obs.2004 GZ14
176Consell Obs.2004 GD2
198Wildberg Obs.2004 EU22
215Buchloe Obs.2004 GD & 2004 GD2
246KLENOT2004 GZ14, 2004 HB, 2004 HD(2) & 2004 HE
300Bisei Spaceguard Center2004 EU22 & 2004 FH
413Australian National Univ. Obs. 1.0m telescope2004 GD
448Desert Moon Obs.2004 GD2 & 2004 GZ14
474Mt. John Obs.2004 FP4, 2004 HE, 2004 HL & 2004 HM
540Linz Obs.2004 GZ14
557Ondrejov Obs.2004 GZ14
566NEAT/Haleakala GEODSS1996 TD9 & 1997 VG
608NEAT/Haleakala AMOS2001 UF5
611Starkenburg Obs.2004 GZ14
620Obs. Astron. de Mallorca2004 GD2(3) & 2004 HM
644NEAT/Palomar2001 SQ263(3), 2001 TE45(2), 2001 UE18(2) & 2001 UF5
649Powell Obs.2004 EU22, 2004 GD2 & 2004 HD(2)
673Table Mountain Obs.2004 GD2
683Goodricke-Pigott Obs.2004 GD
696Whipple Obs.2002 FT6, 2004 EO20, 2004 FB18 & 2004 FM32
699LONEOS2004 FP4 & 2004 HE
704LINEAR2004 EU22, 2004 FP4, 2004 GB19(2), 2004 GC19(2), 2004 GD2(5), 2004 GZ14(2), 2004 HB(2), 2004 HD(2), 2004 HL(2) & 2004 HM(2)
750Hobbs Obs.2004 GD2
854Sabino Canyon Obs.2004 GB19, 2004 GC19, 2004 GD2, 2004 GZ14, 2004 HD & 2004 HM
926Tenagra II Obs.2004 FB18, 2004 FP4, 2004 GC19, 2004 GD2, 2004 GZ14, 2004 HB, 2004 HD(2) & 2004 HM(2)
941Pla D'Arguines Obs.2004 HM
A17Guidestar Obs.2004 GD(2)
A50Andrushivka Obs.2004 GB19, 2004 GC19, 2004 GD2 & 2004 HD(2)
E12Siding Spring Survey (SSS)2004 HD & 2004 HE(2)
E14Hunters Hill Obs.2004 BW18
H06Robert Hutsebaut/New Mexico Skies2004 GB19, 2004 GC19(2), 2004 GD2 & 2004 HE
H36Sandlot Obs.2004 EU22
H41Petit Jean Mountain Obs.2004 EU22
I05Southern TIE (SoTIE)2004 HB & 2004 HD(2)
J77Golden Hill Obs.2004 GD2
J95Great Shefford Obs.2004 GB19, 2004 GC19, 2004 GD(2), 2004 GD2(2) & 2004 GZ14
News briefs – panel 1/1 Major News for 18 April 2004 back top next  
News briefs

Comet news:  After an interruption earlier today, SOHO images of C/2004 F4 (Bradfield)'s perihelion passage have resumed being posted from intervals that are almost hourly. You can watch the spectacular show from here or here.

MPEC 2004-H26 today announces the newest comet discovery, C/2004 H1 (LINEAR). From the first very preliminary calculation, it reached perihelion this last January 13th out past Mars on a retrograde path (i=141.2°) — "driving on the wrong side of the Solar System," one might say. The first LINEAR observation in the MPEC is from early Friday, and it and four other observing facilities confirmed the object yesterday and today.

Namings:  The Minor Planet Center updated its Discovery Circumstances page April 16th with 65 new names, all for asteroids discovered by the LINEAR program, and all named for high school student finalists and finalist mentors in the 2004 Intel Science Talent Search (STS). You can read about them at LINEAR's Ceres Connection Winners for 2004 page, and in the STS 2004 finalists list. They include Lisa Glukhovsky, whose project was "A Rapid, Accurate Method of Determining the Distance to Near-Earth Asteroids." And, nothing to do with astronomy or even gastronomy, but, rather, biochemistry, we have to also mention Jennifer D'Ascoli, whose project was blueberry pie.

The last MPC namings update was March 5th.

Risk monitoring - panel 1/1 Major News for 18 April 2004 back top next  
Risk monitoring 18 April

JPL has posted 2004 HM, which was announced today in MPEC 2004-H25 as discovered early Friday by LINEAR in New Mexico, which also caught it yesterday morning, followed by Tenagra II Observatory in Arizona and then Mt. John Observatory in New Zealand. The confirmation process was closed out this morning by Pla D'Arguines Observatory in Spain and the Observatorio Astronomico de Mallorca (OAM), followed by Sabino Canyon and Tenagra II observatories in Arizona. JPL puts 2004 HM's diameter at about 90 meters/yards.

The Sunday Daily Orbit Update MPEC has observation of 2004 GE2 from LINEAR in New Mexico yesterday morning. Today JPL cut its impact solution count from five to one (in the year 2100) and slightly lowered its overall risk ratings for this object.

Summary Risk Table - sources checked at 0337 UTC, 19 Apr

Object

Assessment

Years

VI
PS
cum
PS
max
T
S
Arc 
days
 2004 HMJPL 4/182101-21043-5.13-5.1402.031
 2004 GE2JPL 4/182100-21001-5.21-5.2105.058
 2004 GA1 NEODyS 4/162026-20805-2.71-2.8503.978
JPL 4/162026-209911-2.76-3.0203.978
VI = count of "virtual impactors" (impact solutions)
See A/CC's Consolidated Risk Tables for more and maybe
  newer details, and check the monitors' links for latest info.
Note that only objects recently in view are shown here.
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